State Socialism, Pro and Con; Official Documents and Other Authoritative Selections-Showing the World-Wide Replacement of Private by Governmental Industry Before and During the War

State Socialism, Pro and Con; Official Documents and Other Authoritative Selections-Showing the World-Wide Replacement of Private by Governmental Industry Before and During the War

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ...Education Department, which is a State institution. If we had not adopted that policy we should have had to build the schools closer together than they are now, although we have a great number of schools throughout the country. In the case of certain denominations who have not got their schools within easy distance we carry the children free to schools of the denomination to which they belong. That has been our policy for many years, and it has worked admirably. Although the population of the islands was small, the people were spread over the whole country. He was quite sure that the railway policy of the Government had played an important part in that development. They believed in New Zealand that no one could afford to take as little out of the railways as the State found it necessary to take. As a matter of fact, they preferred to allow the consolidated earnings and the revenue of the country to make up the deficit, and keep low rates for the benefit of the producers and the traveling public, rather than keep up high rates and retard the development of the country. In his opinion, and he thought in the opinion of others also, nothing had done more to make New Zealand prosperous than an efficient system of railways, affording comparatively cheap rates to the people of the country. The State railways in New Zealand were controlled by a Minister responsible to Parliament, and through Parliament to the people. For a few years they had Railway Commissioners, but it was found that the Commissioners were indisposed to reduce rates for the purpose of developing the industries of the country to the same extent as the Government was prepared to reduce them. For that and other reasons that system of management became unpopular, and it was superseded by...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 266 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 481g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236647920
  • 9781236647924