The State and the Railroads; Argument of Chauncey M. DePew, General Counsel of the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad Co., Before the Special Investigating Committee of the New York Assembly, at the Chamber of Commerce, Volume 1

The State and the Railroads; Argument of Chauncey M. DePew, General Counsel of the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad Co., Before the Special Investigating Committee of the New York Assembly, at the Chamber of Commerce, Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1880 edition. Excerpt: ...a question by a member of your committee, he said he thought the manufacturers in this State ought to be protected by special rates in their competition with manufacturers outside the State. Then youcannot pass this bill in its present shape, or in any form which has been suggested. Once admit the necessity of these discriminations and legislation becomes impossible. You cannot frame any general act which will not stop, at once, the granting of these privileges which the energetic and able leader of the friends of this measure here publicly declared to be both necessary and wise. Why, gentlemen, to build up these manufactories there have been, within the time you have been members of this House, great numbers of bills introduced to exempt them from taxation, on the plea that the locality was willing to bear all the burdens to induce capital to start these industries in the neighborhood. Towns and villages have gone even further, and four or five years ago a perfect flood of bills were presented to enable villages to contribute to the capital of local manufacturers, and they were only defeated because they were unconstitutional. I will call attention to only one other feature of this bill, which provides like rates for like classes of freight; this would compel us to carry pig iron, flour, sugar, molasses, grain and great numbers of articles in the same general classification, but totally different in bulk and value at the same rate. Railroad classifications are made for the convenience and ' not price.-the Session Laws. for every single article we transported, and make a volume larger than Nothing better exhibits the jumble of conflicting statutes from which this bill is copied, than its various provisions in ref This law would...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 76 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236813170
  • 9781236813176