The State of the Negotiation; With Details of Its Progress and Causes of Its Terminiation, in the Recall of the Earl of Lauderdale

The State of the Negotiation; With Details of Its Progress and Causes of Its Terminiation, in the Recall of the Earl of Lauderdale : To Which Is Added, a Copious Supplementary Review, and Exposition of the Direct Falsehoods and

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1806 edition. Excerpt: ...to the full evidence of the thing itself, gave authority to their arguments, -'--the apathy of the-Emperor was moved and the Russianian mics had marched. The failure of the campaign was the signal of the ruin of this party. The character of the Emperor, ---we speak not in disrespect to this excellent Prince, --centsis rather domestic, and suited to his age and station, than composed of those extraordinary virtues, and that ardent heroism, which was necessary to meet the peril of. the times, but which, as not in the common course of nature, it would be injustice to expect as indie. pensable in the character of a Prince. In-the revolution of centuries a state of things may doubt less arise, which may require a Gustavus on Henry the Fourth to ward off the extraordinaq peril, and save his country, and-the worid. But in the regular courseof things, the domestic-vir-' tile, moderation, and simplicity, of an Alexander, are perhaps of more real worth than the more splendidtalents of either an Henry or Gu.stazu-s., The.Emperor, therefore, was very naturally dis-gusted with a war which had terminated so little-.to his expectation. In-the court of the Emperor, moreover, there was something of an interior cabinet, --a kind of domestic cabal, which, without the pstentation of-business, or any responsible or ofiicial characler, were in no the actual Ministry, .--they governed the Prince at their pleasure, and, according to a narrow interest peculiarly their own, indifferently seconded or thwarted the acknowledged Administration. Every thing, there-fore, at the Court of Petersburg, had long passed ' "into intrigue, and wasdirected or controuled by these court parties. Every thing, thus, partook.-of the nature of its authors. It would have been idle tshow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236905261
  • 9781236905260