Standard History of Music; A First History for Students at All Ages Forty Illustrated Story Lessons in the Development of Musical Art, Adapted for Beginners, Musical Clubs, Private Teaching, Classwork and General Reading, Including an

Standard History of Music; A First History for Students at All Ages Forty Illustrated Story Lessons in the Development of Musical Art, Adapted for Beginners, Musical Clubs, Private Teaching, Classwork and General Reading, Including an

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 edition. Excerpt: ...piano method. John Field, born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1782, died in 1837, was a wonderful child-performer and was employed by Clementi to show off pianos in dementi's store in return for instruction. Aside from tours on the continent, he spent most of his life in London and in Russia, where he was very popular. He wrote seven concertos, many sonatas and many Nocturnes (noc'-toorns), which were the forerunners of the great nocturnes written by Chopin. A nocturne is a short piano-piece in song form, and the word means "a piece to be played in the evening or night." Field was a pianist of high rank and as a teacher he was exceptionally successful. Friedrich Kalkbrenner (kalk'-bren-ner), born in Paris, 1788, died in 1870, was a pupil of Clementi and Albrechtsberger. He was an exceedingly fine pianist and his keyboard technique was considered very remarkable. After tours in Germany and France, he settled in Paris as a teacher and was unusually successful. He once offered to teach Chopin, but the offer was spurned. Artistically, Chopin was already much greater. Kalkbrenner wrote some sonatas and many very fine studies for piano; but, lacking the artistic value of the Chopin studies, and the technical value of those of other writers, they are little used now. He also wrote a pianoforte method. Carl Czerny (tschair-nee), born in Vienna, 1791, died in 1857, was a pupil of his father and of Beethoven. He wrote over one thousand works in all forms of music composition. He is best known for his collections of studies for piano, particularly the School of Velocity and the School of Legato (leh-gah'-to) and Staccato (stac-cah'-to), which, together with volumes of selections from his works, have a worldwide use. His most famous pupils were Franz Liszt...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 50 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236640780
  • 9781236640789