St. Francis of Assisi; His Times, Life and Work Lectures Delivered in Substance in the Ladye Chapel of Worcester Cathedral in the Lent of 1896

St. Francis of Assisi; His Times, Life and Work Lectures Delivered in Substance in the Ladye Chapel of Worcester Cathedral in the Lent of 1896

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1897 edition. Excerpt: ... that he founded several monasteries in Burgos, Logrofio, Avila, and Vitoria. What time he exactly spent in Spain we do not know. His intention was to have gone to Morocco, but again his mission effort was hindered, although this time by a different cause. Constant fatigue, constant work, and the incessant activity of his burning spirit began to tell upon a frail and sensitive frame. He fell ill of a violent fever. It was evident that a journey into Africa was impossible, and he Chavin de Malan, Histoire. 'chap. v. p. 125; St. Bonaventura, Vita, chap. iv.; Suysken, Comment. Prav., Acta Sanctorum, Oct., xlii. 292-296. t Thomas of Celano, Vita Prima, cap. vii. pp. 55, 56. L determined to return to Italy. There is some little doubt both as to his route and as to the exact time of his return. He certainly visited the shrine of St. Iago de Compostella on his way, and it seems most probable that he returned by the route of the Pyrenees. He passed through Perpignan, and visited Montpellier, and stayed at Lunel. The Baron de Lunel was completely won over by him, and his preaching at this place and to his noble guests bore fruit afterwards, for the celebrated Franciscan Gerard, afterwards called "Blessed," who is especially reverenced in the diocese of Montpellier to this day, was the grandson of the Baron. St. Francis continued his route through Provence, Piedmont and Lombardy. He stayed at Avignon and went by the valley of the Durance to Gap. It is 9a, id that in crossing the river when swollen by excessive rains, he and his companion were only saved from disaster by the kind intervention of a friendly peasant, and at Gap the inn called the "Bon Estaou" (.., the good inn) is still shown as the place where he stayed....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 92 pages
  • 184 x 240 x 8mm | 180g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236633512
  • 9781236633514