Spons' Dictionary of Engineering, Civil, Mechanical, Military, and Naval; With Technical Terms in French, German, Italian, and Spanish Volume 1

Spons' Dictionary of Engineering, Civil, Mechanical, Military, and Naval; With Technical Terms in French, German, Italian, and Spanish Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1869 edition. Excerpt: ...sulphur to one of calcium, and a quinquiaulphide containing fivo atoms of sulphur. The compound containing the highest proportion of sulphur is often called the pcrsulphide. A good custom is to designate the compounds which contain more sulphur than the protosulphide by prefixes of Latin origin, and to distinguish those which may contain less sulphur than the protosulphide by means of Greek prefixes; thus, if there were a compound of two atoms of calcium and one of sulphur, it would properly be called a c/i-sulphide of calcium, the prefix being from the Greek Sis. The same prefixes are used in an analogous manner in connection with the words oxide, chloride, bromide, iodide, and the similar words ending in ide. Many modem writers on chemistry employ a notation which wo append. Some of the symbols and contractions of this notation are embodied in the notation we have just explained. One equivalent of oxygon;--written above a symbol representing an element, and repeated to indicate two, throe, or more equivalents; thus, Fe denotes a compound of one equivalent of oxygen with one of iron; S a compound of three equivalents of oxygen with one of sulphur. 'One equivalent of sulphur;--used in the same manner as the preceding; thus, Fe denotes a compound of two equivalents of sulphur and one of iron. A dash drawn across a symbol having either of the foregoing signs above it, denotes that two equivalents of the substance represented by the symbol are joined with the number of equivalents of oxygen or sulphur indicated by the dots or commas; thus, F-e represents a compound of two equivalents of iron and three of oxygen, forming sesqui-oxide of iron. + indicates, in organic chemistry, a base or alkaloid, when placed above the initial letter of the name of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 234 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 426g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236498496
  • 9781236498496