Speeches of the Hon. Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi; Delivered During the Summer of 1858

Speeches of the Hon. Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi; Delivered During the Summer of 1858

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1859 edition. Excerpt: ...that their criminal hearts should fear that those voices, so long slumbering, would break their silence, that the Ibrms which look down from these walls behind and around me, would walk forth, and that their sabres would once more be drawn from their scabbards, to drive from this sacred temple fanatical men, who desecrate it more than did the changers of money and those who sold doves, the temple of the living God. Loud cheers. And here, too, you have, to remind you, and to remind all who enter this hall, the portraits of those men who are dear to every lover of liberty, and part and parcel of the memory of every American citizen. Highest among them all 1 see you have placed Samuel Adams and John Hancock. Applause. You have placed them tfao highejt qnA properly; for they were the two, the only two, excepted from the proclamation of mercy, when Governor Gage issued his anathema against them and their fellow patriots. These men, thus excepted from the saving grace of the crown, now occupy the highest place in Faneuil Hall, and thus are consecrated highest in the reverence of the people of Boston. Applause. This is one of trie instances in which we find tradition more reliable than history; for tradition has borne the name of Samuel Adams to the remotest corner of Out territory, placed it among the household words taught to the rising generation, and there in the new States intertwined with our love of representative liberty, it is a name as sacred among us as it is among you of New England. Applause. We remember how early he saw the necessity of community independence. How, through the dim mists of the future, and in advance of his day, he looked forward to the proclamation of that independence by Massachusetts; how he steadily strove, through good...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 38 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 86g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236601149
  • 9781236601148