Speech on the Commercial Policy of France and in Opposition to the Introduction of Free-Trade Into France, Delivered on the 27th of June, 1851, Tr. by M. de Saint Felix, and to Which Tr. Has Been Added a Note on Russian Wheat, and Also

Speech on the Commercial Policy of France and in Opposition to the Introduction of Free-Trade Into France, Delivered on the 27th of June, 1851, Tr. by M. de Saint Felix, and to Which Tr. Has Been Added a Note on Russian Wheat, and Also

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 edition. Excerpt: ...cotton. After that I will give you some quotations of facts and pass to theories. What did cotton represent in France in 1786? Perhaps 20 or 25 millions of production, and at present from 6 to 700 millions. This is the great harm done by protecting cotton! Instead of representing from 20 to 25 millions as formerly, it represents at present 700 millions of work! What a misfortune indeed! Now has cotton also been a lazy fellow falling asleep under the shelter of protection? Hore is the progress of prices: ten years ago they manufactured in France 34 million killogrammes of cotton, at present 65 millions, and these 65 cost just what the 34 millions cost, viz. from 6 to 700 millions. Thus at present they supply to the French people 65 million kilogrammes of manufactured cotton for the same price at which they supplied ten years ago 34 millions, from the mere spur of home competition. If you wish to go hack still further you will see the progress of prices. The kilogramme of spun cotton which costs at present 8 fr. 20 centimes, cost ten years ago 6 fr., and at the fall of the empire 12 fr. 60 centimes. Thus in 36 years they have fallen four times the value of the merchandise. I well know that comparatively to the English cotton there is still 10 or 15 per cent. difference according to some persons, and 30 or 40 per cent. according to others. As for me I have tried to find in that respect the "prix de revient," or actual cost, and I am induced to think that we are still at a distance of 30 per cent. from English. You perhaps still helieve that it is the fault of protection if we are at that distance from our rivals; for such is the constant argument of Free-traders! This will lead us to one of the most important ohservations on the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123698367X
  • 9781236983671