Speech of Mr. Everett, of Massachusetts, on the Bill for Removing the Indians from the East to the West Side of the Mississippi Volume 16, No. 5

Speech of Mr. Everett, of Massachusetts, on the Bill for Removing the Indians from the East to the West Side of the Mississippi Volume 16, No. 5

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1830 edition. Excerpt: ...enough to reach them. In a few years the advanced guard of your population is upon them; their flank is turned, their rear is cut off. 'l'he 'I'erritory of Arkansas, in which there is an estimated population of one to the square mile, is sadly crowded; there is no room for the Indians; they must leave their settlements, just beginning to thrive, theirhouses, their farms, their schools and churches, and remove beyond the frontier, to anew permanent home. Two parties of Creeks have followed the example, and gone to their permanent home on lands just allotted to the Choctaws and Chero kees. It will probably be among their first occupations to fight for their title to this land of. refuge; particularly when seventy-five thousand recruits come pouring in, (driven forward by " a few troops," who, we are told, will be needed to aid in this voluntary removal, ) and who are to find their permanent home in the wilderness already granted away. Sir, if you really do carry out this policy, its wretched objects will indeed come to a permanent hoI., in its execution, of a nature dill'ercnt from that you profess to contemplate. You will soon drive them up to that bourne from which neither emigrant_nor traveller returns. This is the effect, whatever be the provisions of the hill. But let us, Mr. Speaker, conemplate it more closely. What is, In the general, the necessary character of a measure like this, a forced removal of whole _tribes oflndians from their native dist-ricts to a distant wilderness. I will give it, sir, not in my own language, but in that of the President of the United States, at the commencement of the session: L).,4 " The condition and ulterior destiny of the lndisn tribes within the limits of some of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236992385
  • 9781236992383