Speech in the House of Commons April the 23d, 1799, on Seconding the Motion for the House to Agree with the Lords in an Address to His Majesty Relative to a Union with Ireland

Speech in the House of Commons April the 23d, 1799, on Seconding the Motion for the House to Agree with the Lords in an Address to His Majesty Relative to a Union with Ireland

By (author) 

List price: US$22.40

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1800 edition. Excerpt: ...bound in duty to guard and maintain them, as of some who have come forward in public the earnest and zealous opposes of the Catholic claims should the present local Mr. Foster's Speech, p. 67. Parliament Parliament remain--of the venerable Primate of Ireland, as declared in his speech on the 22d of January last, and of Dr. Duigenan, as stated in his celebrated Answer to Mr. Gratlan--that Catholic emancipation, as it is afsectedly called, might, in case of the legislative incorporation of Ireland with this country, be acceded to without danger. The words of Dr. Duigenan are remarkable. They struck me much on the first appearance of his work, before this measure of Union had been so generally thought of as it has been since; and I then pointed them out to the attention of many of my friends. I believe they have already been reserred to in some former debates; but as the passage is short, I will take the liberty of reading it. If we were one people with the British nation, the 4 preponderance of the Protestant body of the whole em pire would be so great, that all rivalship and jealousies 'between Protestants and Romanists would cease for 'ever; and it would not be necessary, for the fasety of 'the empire at large, to curb the Romanists by any ex elusive laws whatsoever t.' If the Catholics shouldnot be admitted into the United Parliament, still they will not then have to complain that they are excluded by a great minority of the nation; nor will they be any longer exposed to that sense of a mortifying and galling inseriority, which they fay it is the habit, which I sear it is in the nature, of their local Legislature to excite, acted upon and stirred up to perpetual exertions of severe authority, by the jealousy and apprehensions to which...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 58 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236967097
  • 9781236967091