Speech of Hon. J.B. Henderson, of Missouri, on the Present Condition of the Country and the Remedy for Existing Evils; Delivered in the United States Senate, February 13 and 14, 1866

Speech of Hon. J.B. Henderson, of Missouri, on the Present Condition of the Country and the Remedy for Existing Evils; Delivered in the United States Senate, February 13 and 14, 1866

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1866 edition. Excerpt: ... In that case, the defendant had been indicted for "counterfeiting and uttering counterfeit coin," and there was a general verdict of guilty. In the President's certificate of pardon it was recited that the defendant had been convicted of counterfeiting, and thereupon afullanduneonditional pardon was granted. The court refused to extend the pardon beyond its express terms, and hence the party was left subject to the disabilities imposed by the conviction and sentence. Another principle necessarily resulting from this was, that whenever it may be reasonablysupposed that the King, when he grants a pardon, is not fully apprised of the heinousness or wickedness of the crime, or that he has been imposed upon by concealment or false representations of the party to be benefited, the pardon is void. But a more familiar principle still is the one previously alluded to, that if a pardon be granted on conditions and the conditions be not complied with the pardon is void. It may be that the President was fully advised of the character and extent of the crimes of the rebels when he issued his proclamation. It may be that no imposition was practiced on him to secure the amnesty, but if it be so, it surely cannot be that they have kept the conditions of the pardon, at least the President cannot think so. The pardon was general, and included the entire community with certain exceptions. Those exceptions could not participate in reorganization. The community pardoned did participate. In ascertaining whether there has been a compliance with the conditions, we must not, we cannot, look to isolated or individual cases. We must look to the community, the body-politic, and hold all responsible for the action of that pandoned community. The condition was that...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 38 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 86g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236530713
  • 9781236530714