Speech of the Hon. Horace Binney, on the Question of the Removal of the Deposites; Delivered in the House of Representatives, January, 1834

Speech of the Hon. Horace Binney, on the Question of the Removal of the Deposites; Delivered in the House of Representatives, January, 1834

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1834 edition. Excerpt: ...against power in office; now its action is in support of that power, and tends to the augmentation of what is already great enough. I say, in conclusion upon this point, if these publications are deemed by this House to have been unlawful, return the deposites till the Bank has been heard. Go to the scire facias--give to the Bank that trial by jury which is secured by its charter, and is the birthright of all. Ask the unspotted and unsuspected tribunals of the country for their instruction. Arraign the Bank upon the ground either of sedition, or grasping at political power. There was ample time for it, and still is; and there is a great precedent for it, which I commend to the consideration of this House. Sir, in the worst days of one of the worst princes of England, (I mean Charles the 2d, ) the love of absolute rule induced him to make an attempt upon the liberties of (he city of London, whose charter he desired to overthrow. He complained that the Common Council had taxed him with a delay of justice, and had possessed the people with an ill opinion of him; and by means of his ministers of the law, and by infamously packing the bench, having promoted one judge, who was not satisfied on the point, and turned out another who was not clear, he succeeded in obtaining a judgment under which the liberties of that ancient city were seized by the crown. But, when the revolution expelled his successor, and the principles of the British constitution came in with the House of Orange, an early statute of William and Mary reversed the judgment as illegal and arbitrary; and from that time it has been the opprobium of the bench, and the scorn of the profession. The.'account of it which is given by Burnet is thus: --" The " court, finding that the city...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 56 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 118g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236507835
  • 9781236507839