Speech of the Hon. Ben Hardin; On the Subject of the Removal of the Deposites. Delivered in the House of Representatives, April 1 and 3, 1834

Speech of the Hon. Ben Hardin; On the Subject of the Removal of the Deposites. Delivered in the House of Representatives, April 1 and 3, 1834

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1834 edition. Excerpt: ...he knows that the removal of the deposites was determined on by General Jackson to be made before the session of Congress, for the purpose, as Amos Kendall declared in Philadelphia last summer, to anticipate the action of Congress; and if that body did attempt-to act, then to use the veto power upon their action. Let us see what the President himself says on the subject, as given to the public by Mr. Duane, in his letters. The verity of the statement has not been denied. In the third letter we find the following passages: My commission bore the date of May 29,1833, arfd on the 30th I reached Washington. After waiting upon the President on the next day, I went to the Treasury Department, and took the oath of office on the 1st June. Onthe evening of that day, Mr. Reuben M. Whitney called upon me at my lodgings, at the desire, as he said, of the President, to make known to me what had been done, and what was contemplated in relation to the United States Bank. He stated that the President had concluded to take upon himself the responsibility of directing the Secretary of the Treasury to remove the public deposites from that Bank, and to transfer them to State banks; that he had asked the members of the cabinet to give him their opinions on the subject; that the President had said, ' Mr. Taney and Mr. Barry had come out like men for the removal;' that Mr. McLane had given a long opinion against it, but had given no written opinion; and that Mr. Woodbury had given an opinion which was ' yes' and ' no;' that the President would It is due to this gentleman to state, that I subsequently learned he was opposed to-- removal prior to July, 1834, and was for only a gradual change afterwards. make the act his own, by addressing a paper or order to the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236658930
  • 9781236658937