The Spectator with Sketches of the Lives of the Authors and Explanatory, 1; With Sketches of the Lives of the Authors and Explanatory Notes

The Spectator with Sketches of the Lives of the Authors and Explanatory, 1; With Sketches of the Lives of the Authors and Explanatory Notes

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1797 edition. Excerpt: ...an' mare instant; 'Yctanfa cum strrpitu ludis tctantur, et artes, Di-vitizgue perigrint; gmssbzt: ob/zsitu: actor Cnmstctit in flcna, concurrit dextera seem. Dixit ad/mc asiguid F Nilshne. Qaid plant ago? Luna 'arentino violet imitata mue-no. HOK. Ep. 1. l. 2. v. 2o2._ Iivn-rA-rzo. Loud as the wolves, on Orca's stormy Keep, Howl to the roarings of the northern deep: Such is the shout, the long applauding note, At Quirffs high plume, or Oldfielffis petticoat; Or when from court a birth-day suit bestovs/'dz Sinks the lost actor in the tawdry load. Booth enters hark! the universal peal!-But has he spoken?--Not a syllable. What hook the stage, and made the people (tare L Cato's long wig, flow'rd gown, and lacquei-'d chair; Pore. RXSTOTLE has observed, that ordinary writers in tragedy endeavour to raise terror and pity in their audience, not by proper sentiments and exprefiions, but by the dresses and decorations of the Rage. There is something of this kind very ridiculous in the English theatre. When the author has a mind to terrisify us, it Jhunders; when he would make us melancholy, the stage is darkened. But among all our tragic artifiees, I am the most offended at those which are made use of to inspire us with magnificent ideas of the persone that speak. The ordinary method of making an hero, is to clap a huge plume of feathers upon his head, which rises so very high, that there is often a greater length from his chin to the top of his head than to the soleros his foot. One would believe, that thought a" great man and a talk man the same thing. This very much embarraffes the actor, who is forced to hold his neck extremely stiff and Ready all the w-hile-he speaks; and notwithstanding any' anxieties which-he pretends for his...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 116 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 222g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123676627X
  • 9781236766274