The Spectator, with Illustrative Notes; To Which Are Prefixed, the Lives of Authors Comprehending, Addison, Steele, Parnell, Hughes, Buegel, Eusden, Tickell, and Pope with Critical Remarks about Their Writings Volume 3

The Spectator, with Illustrative Notes; To Which Are Prefixed, the Lives of Authors Comprehending, Addison, Steele, Parnell, Hughes, Buegel, Eusden, Tickell, and Pope with Critical Remarks about Their Writings Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1794 edition. Excerpt: ...posterity. They aft the counterparts of a Confucius or a Socrates; and seem to have been sent into the world to deprave human nature, and sink it into the condition of brutality. I have seen some Roman-Catholic authors who tell us that vicious writers continue in Purgatory so long as the influence of their writings continue upon posterity: for Purgatory, say they, is nothing else but a cleansing us of our sins, which cannot be said to be done away, so' long as they continue to operate, . and corrupt mankind. The vicious author, say they, sins after death, and so long as he continues to sin, so long muct he expect to be punished. Though the RomanCatholic notion of Purgatory be indeed very ridiculous, one cannot but think that if the soul after death has any knowledge of what passes in this world, that of an immoral writer would receive much more regret from the sense of corrupting, than satisfaction from the thought of pleasing his surviving admirers. To take off from the severity of this speculation, I shall conclude this paper with a story of an atheistical author, who at a time he lay dangerously sick, and had desired the assistance of a neighbouring curate, confessed to him with great contrition, that nothing sat more heavy at his heart than the sense of his having seduced the age by his writings, and that their evil influence was likely to continue even after his death. The curate, upon further examination, finding the penitent in the utmost agonies of despair, and being himself a man of learning, told him, that he hoped his case was not so desperate as he apprehended, since he found that he was so very sensible of his fault, and so sincerely repented of it. The penitent still urged the evil tendency of his book to subvert all religion, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 116 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 222g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236544900
  • 9781236544902