Specimens of the Popular Poetry of Persia, as Found in the Adventures and Improvisations of Kurroglou, and in the Songs of the People Inhabiting the Shores of the Caspian Sea

Specimens of the Popular Poetry of Persia, as Found in the Adventures and Improvisations of Kurroglou, and in the Songs of the People Inhabiting the Shores of the Caspian Sea

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1842 edition. Excerpt: ...the club dropped before the pasha himself, on the ground. All that were present were struck with panic. Kurroglou was aware that the only arm in the world that could perform this miracle, was that of Mustapha-beg. When the pasha asked him for the meaning of this occurrence, he replied, " May the pasha live long! It is nothing at all. This club was thrown in the air by some of thy courtiers in their sport." The pasha ordered the prisoners to be put to death; Kurroglou thought in his heart, " Demurchy-Oglou sang the praises of Daly-Ahmed in the pasha's presence, it would be an act of base jealousy on thy part, not to praise before all these men Mustapha-beg, who has thrown the club higher than any man in the world is capable of doing." " May the pasha live long! some verses have just come into my memory. Listen to them first, and let the robbers be put to death afterwards." Improvisation.--" A fire came down upon the earth from heaven. I imagined that my life--that my days had withered. Ayvaz had reached me a cup filled to the brim. It was a cup of bitterness, I thought he had drunk my red blood. He has awakened me from drunkenness. Death has sold itself to me, and like a female slave purchased with gold, she is now waiting for my orders. It was Mustapha-beg that threw the club! Yes, I fancied I beheld mountains falling down on the valley." In the mean time, the crowd was becoming thinner. Kurroglou's eyes fell on the prisoners, who were standing, with their heads uncovered, having nothing but their shirts on. He was moved by the sight, and sang as follows: --Improvisation.--"l look to my right and to my left; roses are scattered over the ground. The sun is descending beyond...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 116 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 222g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236934873
  • 9781236934871