Specimens of the Popular Poetry of Persia; As Found in the Adventures and Improvisations of Kurroglou, the Bandit-Minstrel of Northern Persia and in the Songs of the People Inhabiting the Shores of the Caspian Sea

Specimens of the Popular Poetry of Persia; As Found in the Adventures and Improvisations of Kurroglou, the Bandit-Minstrel of Northern Persia and in the Songs of the People Inhabiting the Shores of the Caspian Sea

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1842 edition. Excerpt: ...sitting round a fire in a narrow passage amongst the rocks. "Allow me to ask you whose camp is this?" "Nazar-Jalali's." "Allow me then to ask you where is he going?" "If you wish to know the truth, he is going against Kurroglou with the intention of killing him and taking possession of Chamly-bill." Daly having raised up his club, killed the respondent, saying, There is thy reward for good news." He then asked another, "For what purpose did Nazar-Jalali come here?" "He came on a visit to Kurroglou, that he might, himself and his army, learn the art of military tactics, and then go back home." Daly drew his sword and cut his head off. In this manner he killed one after another to the last; and he said to himself, "I shall not be able to learn the truth otherwise than by asking the chief himself." He rode, therefore, on horseback into the middle of the encampment, alighted before Nazar-Jalali's tent, and walked into it. A great number of chiefs were sitting around the chief; and they were so proud that none of them deigned to look at him. Daly took the nearest by the hand, threw him on the ground from the cushion, and sat in his place. Nazar-Jalali said, "A guest never sits himself down till he is asked to do so: what an odd man thou art?" "When a guest perceives that his post is occupied by an ignorant and stupid man, he must help himself. It is written in the Koran, Honour thy guest although he be an infidel." "Who art thou?" "In Chamly-bill they call me the servant of Kurroglou." "What is thy name?" "DalyHassan." "What is thy business here?" "I came to levy the haratch. You must pay me...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 118 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236775058
  • 9781236775054