Specimens of the Greek and Roman Classic Poets; In a Chronological Series from Homer to Tryphiodorus, Translated Into English Verse, and Illustrated W

Specimens of the Greek and Roman Classic Poets; In a Chronological Series from Homer to Tryphiodorus, Translated Into English Verse, and Illustrated W

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1854 edition. Excerpt: ...an epic cycle, or circle of events, relating to the Trojan war. It has been conjectured that Quintus borrowed his fable from the "Memnon" of Arctinus, the Mile-sian; the "Little Iliad" of Lesches, the Lesbian; and the "Destruction of Troy" of Stesichorus, the Sicilian. This poem is highly interesting as the most ancient specimen extant of the post-homeric epopaea; and it has a vigour and peculiarity of character which cannot belong to mere imitation. As a supplement, it naturally wants the completeness of an entire action; and is in fact a succession of actions with their successive heroes. But the interest never languishes. The characters have a dramatic energy, a force, and contrast, which we desiderate in those of Virgil: he has evidently formed himself on a more ancient, a more simple, and more vigorous school; and often recalls to us the racy nature, and pregnant fancy of Homer, in the strong pathos of his incidents, and the fertility of his images. Yet Gilbert Wakefield, whose critical competency as a scholar cannot be doubted, but whose taste had imbibed a tincture of the classic prejudice, speaks of Quintus, in his correspondence with Charles Fox, as an author more interesting from the curious nature of his story than from his genius; and styles his poem puerile. Is there nothing in Homer which might seem puerile in the eyes of a modern, if viewed without reference to the manners of his age? Quintns has in fact retained the romantic credulity of the fabulous ages, in the spirit of Homeric simplicity; and with a faithful regard to those heroical traditions which he found recorded in the ancient post-homeric bards. Had the same details been found in Homer, classical enthusiasm would have dwelt on these...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 76 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236534409
  • 9781236534408