Specimens of the Early English Poets; To Which Is Prefixed an Historical Sketch of the Rise and Progress of the English Poetry and Language Volume N .

Specimens of the Early English Poets; To Which Is Prefixed an Historical Sketch of the Rise and Progress of the English Poetry and Language Volume N .

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1803 edition. Excerpt: ...We happy shepherds thence did thrive, and And thou wast mine and all men's theme And in two streams doth weakly creep, our common Muse is thence grown low and poor, And mine as lean as these my sheep. But think withal what honour thou hast lost, Which we did to thy full stream pay! Whilst now that swain that swears he loves thee most Slakcs but his thirst and goes away! I I I I I FA LS E HOOD. An Extract. STILL do the stars impart their light To those that travel in the night: Still time runs on, nor doth the hand Or shadow on the dial stand: The streams still glide and constant are: Only thy mind Untrue I find, Which carelessly Neglects to he Like stream or shadow, hand or star. I I! I Y I TELL me not ofjoy! there's none, I Now my little span-ow's gone: He, just as you, Would sigh and woo, He would chirp and flatter me; He would hang the wing a while, Till at length he saw me smile, Lord! how sullen he would be! He would catch a crumb, and then Sporting let it go again; He from my lip Would moisture sip, He would from mytrenchcr feed; Then would hop, and then would run, And cry Phillip when he'd done; Oh! whose heart can choose but bleed? Oh! how eager would he fight, And ne'er hurt though he did bite. No morn did pass, But on my glass I-le would sit, and mark, and do What I did; now ruflle all His feathers o'er, now let them fall, And then straightway sleek them too. Whence will Cupid get his darts Feather'd now, to pierce our hearts? A wound he may, Not love, convey, Now this faithful bird is gone. Oh! let mournful turtles join With loving redbreasts, and combine To sing dirges o'er his stone. WmL1as early light springs from the skies, A fairer from your bride doth rise; A brighter day doth thence appear, And make...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 72 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 145g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236556038
  • 9781236556035