The Southern States of the American Union, Considered in Their Relations to the Constitution of the United States and to the Resulting Union

The Southern States of the American Union, Considered in Their Relations to the Constitution of the United States and to the Resulting Union

By (author) 

List price: US$15.77

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ...advocated in some of the gazettes, and preached from the pulpit during Jefferson's administration; that unceasing endeavors were made to poison the minds of the people of the Eastern States and to alienate them from their fellowcitizens of the South, and that it was beyond doubt that during the war there existed in New England a conspiracy, among a few of the most wealthy and influential citizens, to effect a dissolution of the Union, at every hazard, and to form a separate Confederacy.1 Horatio Seymour, on October 8, 1880, in a public address in New York City, thus spoke: "The first threat of disunion was uttered upon the floor of Congress by Josiah Quincy, one of the most able and distinguished sons of Massachusetts. At an early day Mr. Hamilton with all his distrust of the Constitution, sent word to the citizens of Boston to stop their threats of disunion and to let the Government stand as long as it would. When our country was engaged with the superior power, population, and resources of Great Britain, when its armies were upon our soil, when the walls of its 1 See pp. 7, 49, 204, 205. Capitol were blackened and marred by the fires kindled by our foes, and our Union was threatened with disasters, the leading officials and citizens of New England threatened resistance to the military measures of the Administration. This was the language held by a convention of delegates appointed by the Legislatures of three of the New England States, and by delegates from counties in Vermont and New Hampshire: 'In cases of deliberate, dangerous, and palpable infractions of the Constitution, affecting the sovereignty of a State and liberties of the people, it is not only the right but the duty of such State to interpose for their protection in the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 58 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236943562
  • 9781236943569