South Tyrol

South Tyrol : A Minority Conflict of the Twentieth Century

3.6 (5 ratings by Goodreads)
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Description

South Tyrol, a region in the heart of the Alps about half the size of Connecticut,brings into sharp focus an important part of twentieth-century history. Tyrol,a province that had been part of Austria for over 500 years and was almosttotally German-speaking, was split in two after World War I and the southern part awarded to Italy as "spoils of war."
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Product details

  • Paperback | 175 pages
  • 151.4 x 223.5 x 12.4mm | 299.38g
  • Taylor & Francis Inc
  • Transaction Publishers
  • Somerset, United Kingdom
  • English
  • New
  • 1, black & white illustrations
  • 0765808005
  • 9780765808004
  • 1,403,455

Review quote

" ... Steininger demonstrates with brutal clarity is the inability of small ethnic communities to determine their own destiny." - " German Studies Review " -The South Tyrol, or Alto Adige, became Italian with the treaties ending WW I. Austrian since the Middle Ages, it was mostly German and Ladinian speaking. Because Austria lost the war and Italy helped the Allies win it, Italy's reward was the push to the Brenner/Brennero below Innsbruck. From 1922 to 1945, the fascists launched campaigns to eliminate German from schools, Italianize German names, remove German speakers from public offices, and so on. When Mussolini and Hitler became allies, they agreed that German speakers should be removed from the region and replaced by Italians, but the concept did not work. Even after WW II, normalization did not come about until the late 1960s. Today, Italians and German speakers live in some harmony, both seeing advantages to the compromise in which German, Italian, and Ladinian are spoken, as amazing modernization proceeds as quickly as in the rest of mountainous Europe. Luckily for South Tyrol, it became part of Italy at a time when taking over foreign ethnic groups gradually became taboo. Steininger (Univ. of Innsbruck) gives a good overview of this troubled history, telling it from the German speakers' point of view. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above.- --P. Petschauer, Choice - ... Steininger demonstrates with brutal clarity is the inability of small ethnic communities to determine their own destiny.- --German Studies Review "The South Tyrol, or Alto Adige, became Italian with the treaties ending WW I. Austrian since the Middle Ages, it was mostly German and Ladinian speaking. Because Austria lost the war and Italy helped the Allies win it, Italy's reward was the push to the Brenner/Brennero below Innsbruck. From 1922 to 1945, the fascists launched campaigns to eliminate German from schools, Italianize German names, remove German speakers from public offices, and so on. When Mussolini and Hitler became allies, they agreed that German speakers should be removed from the region and replaced by Italians, but the concept did not work. Even after WW II, normalization did not come about until the late 1960s. Today, Italians and German speakers live in some harmony, both seeing advantages to the compromise in which German, Italian, and Ladinian are spoken, as amazing modernization proceeds as quickly as in the rest of mountainous Europe. Luckily for South Tyrol, it became part of Italy at a time when taking over foreign ethnic groups gradually became taboo. Steininger (Univ. of Innsbruck) gives a good overview of this troubled history, telling it from the German speakers' point of view. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above." --P. Petschauer, Choice " ... Steininger demonstrates with brutal clarity is the inability of small ethnic communities to determine their own destiny." --German Studies Review "The South Tyrol, or Alto Adige, became Italian with the treaties ending WW I. Austrian since the Middle Ages, it was mostly German and Ladinian speaking. Because Austria lost the war and Italy helped the Allies win it, Italy's reward was the push to the Brenner/Brennero below Innsbruck. From 1922 to 1945, the fascists launched campaigns to eliminate German from schools, Italianize German names, remove German speakers from public offices, and so on. When Mussolini and Hitler became allies, they agreed that German speakers should be removed from the region and replaced by Italians, but the concept did not work. Even after WW II, normalization did not come about until the late 1960s. Today, Italians and German speakers live in some harmony, both seeing advantages to the compromise in which German, Italian, and Ladinian are spoken, as amazing modernization proceeds as quickly as in the rest of mountainous Europe. Luckily for South Tyrol, it became part of Italy at a time when taking over foreign ethnic groups gradually became taboo. Steininger (Univ. of Innsbruck) gives a good overview of this troubled history, telling it from the German speakers' point of view. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above." --P. Petschauer, Choice " ... Steininger demonstrates with brutal clarity is the inability of small ethnic communities to determine their own destiny." --G"erman Studies Review "
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Rating details

5 ratings
3.6 out of 5 stars
5 20% (1)
4 40% (2)
3 20% (1)
2 20% (1)
1 0% (0)
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