Sound Sense in Suburban Architecture; Containing Hints, Suggestions, and Bits of Practical Information for the Building of Inexpensive Country Houses

Sound Sense in Suburban Architecture; Containing Hints, Suggestions, and Bits of Practical Information for the Building of Inexpensive Country Houses

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ...must be nailed to solid furrings, and lath will not be allowed to run from one room to another behind studding. The lather must call upon the carpenter to furr and straighten all walls, ceilings, etc., and block and spike all studs together solidly at angles. In all cases lath below grounds to floor and behind all wainscoting. In attic rooms and closets will be lathed and plastered. Also the exterior walls of same showing from head of stairs. The entire ceiling of cellar, and the partition walls of servants' water closet, cold room, and laundry to be lathed. Hot air pipes, flues, etc., and a space 10' square over furnace to be lathed with first-class metal lath. To secure real good plaster walls considerable attention must be given to the lathing, and each point above mentioned should be looked after carefully. If King's or Rock Plaster, or any other prepared plaster, is used for plastering the walls, the lath should be placed on a shade closer than a quarter of an inch apart; but in no case should they be placed closer than an eighth of an inch apart. The breasts of chimneys should be furred and lathed instead of plastering directly on the brickwork. If part of the wall is plastered on the brick and the balance on lath the brickwork may settle, and make bad cracks. It is often the case that the settling of the chimney differs from that of the house walls. Consequently if the furring strips are fastened securely to the adjoining woodwork, and not to the chimney brickwork, the weighty masonry may settle considerably and yet not carry the walls along with it. Metal lath should be used instead of wood on all studding near furnace flues. The specifications should be made to say exactly how much lath and plastering there will be in attic and cellar....
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Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236603974
  • 9781236603975