Sorgho Sugar; Or, an Account of the Most Successful Experiments with Chinese Sugar-Cane, Including Full Directions for Making Sugar, Etc

Sorgho Sugar; Or, an Account of the Most Successful Experiments with Chinese Sugar-Cane, Including Full Directions for Making Sugar, Etc

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1858 edition. Excerpt: ...yet small and tender; but all agree that the same mode as with the Indian corn should be pursued. A little more care may be requisite, perhaps, from the fact that the cane does not send up so vigorous a shoot, at first, as the corn. It will be well to recollect that the weeds should be kept out, and the ground well stirred, while the cane is young; but as it approaches maturity, cease to plow or cultivate among it, further than to scrape out the weeds with a hoe; as constant stirring of the soil is said to continue the growth of the plant beyond the period when it should cease growing and begin to ripen.. There is a difference of opinion in regard to the policy of removing the suckers which will appear when the plants are a good distance apart and the soil strong. Some of our correspondents recommend, with especial emphasis, that none but the parent stalks should be allowed to grow; while others say that, after the first thinning out to two plants in a place, every twelve or fifteen inches, in the rows, no further plucking should be allowed; as the removal of one sucker from a hill causes a half dozen more to spring out; and, repeated suckering exhausts the soil and the parent stalk more than a full growth of the first set of shoots, while the difference between the time of ripening, or the quality of juice of the parent stalks and suckers that remain undisturbed from the first, is slight, if appreciable at all. We know of no party who have carefully tried both ways, and carried their experiments far enough to determine which was most profitable; but, from our observations, we incline to the belief that it will be found the most profitable to allow the entire stool to grow, and then, if there is any difference in the time of ripening, ..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 24 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 64g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123680113X
  • 9781236801135