Some Considerations of the Consequences of Lowering the Interest and Raising the Value of Money (Letter to a Member of Parliament. 1691.) Short Observations on a Printed Paper Entitled, 'For Encouraging the Coining Silver Money in

Some Considerations of the Consequences of Lowering the Interest and Raising the Value of Money (Letter to a Member of Parliament. 1691.) Short Observations on a Printed Paper Entitled, 'For Encouraging the Coining Silver Money in

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1824 edition. Excerpt: ...to his purpose, that " every man that " is born is so far from being free, that by his very " birth he becomes a subject of him that begets him," O. 156. So that Adam being the only man created, and all ever since being begotten, nobody has been born free. If we ask how Adam comes by this power over his children, he tells us here it is by begetting them: and so again, O. 223. " This natural dominion of Adam, " says he, may be proved out of Grotius himself, who " teacheth, that generatione jus acquiritur parentibus " in liberos." And indeed the act of begetting being that which makes a man a father, his right of a father over his children can naturally arise from nothing else. 51. Grotius tells us not here how far this " jus in " liberos," this power of parents over their children extends; but our author, always very clear in the point, assures us it is supreme power, and like that of absolute monarchs over their slaves, absolute power of life and death. He that should demand of him, how, or for what reason it is, that begetting a child gives the father such an absolute power over him, will find him answer nothing: we are to take his word forithis, as well as several other things, and by that the laws of nature and the constitutions of government must stand or fall. Had he been an absolute monarch, this way of talking might have suited well enough; " pro ratione voluntas," might have been of force in his mouth; but in the way of proof or argument is. very unbecoming, and will little advantage his plea for absolute monarchy. Sir Robert has too much lessened a subject's authority to leave himself the hopes of establishing any thing by his bare...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 164 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 304g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236925661
  • 9781236925664