Some American Medical Botanists Commemorated in Our Botanical Nomenclature. Delivered as a Lecture Before the Medical Historical Society of Chicago, 1910, and Before the University of Nebraska, October 16, 1913

Some American Medical Botanists Commemorated in Our Botanical Nomenclature. Delivered as a Lecture Before the Medical Historical Society of Chicago, 1910, and Before the University of Nebraska, October 16, 1913

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ...when a young man, and settled near Chester. William was the eldest child of Edward and Hannah Townsend Darlington and one of five sons. He had a common school education, but, hungry for more, persuaded his father to let him 1 The name Darlingtonia had been previously otherwise used. This plant will always be popularly known as "Darlingtonia," but most careful botanists now use the technical name Chrysamphora. (J. H. Barnhart.) "S study medicine with Dr. John Vaughan, of Wilmington, Delaware. He took also private French lessons, studied hard at Latin, Spanish and German and received his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1804. He had the good fortune of being able to attend the botanical lectures of Dr. Benjamin S. Barton, and it is easy to imagine the shoots of his botanic ideas taking root in the firm earth of accurate knowledge. A voyage to India as ship's surgeon gave him leisure for study and reflection, but does not seem to have given him " travel fever " also, for, the following year, he settled down to practise in West Chester, after marrying Catherine, daughter of Gen. John Lacey, of New Jersey. In 1812 international science yielded to international strife, and Darlington became major of the "American Grays," organized to defend Philadelphia. Shortly after he figured as a politician advocating the restriction of slavery. He was nominated by the secretary of war as visitor to West Point. He served on the Board of Canal Commissioners to connect the Great Lakes with the Atlantic, yet, in the midst of much civic business, he found time to botanize and found the Chester County Cabinet of Natural Science and to publish, in 1826, his Florula Cestrica. Later, in 1837, a new edition appeared as...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 44 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236608488
  • 9781236608482