Some Account of Domestic Architecture in England,; With Numerous Illustrations of Existing Remains from Original Drawings Volume 1

Some Account of Domestic Architecture in England,; With Numerous Illustrations of Existing Remains from Original Drawings Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1851 edition. Excerpt: ...were cross roads at this time, that guides, --shepherds, and persons of a like degree, --were usually hired to conduct travellers from one town to another; especially if it was desirable to take a shorter route than the high road; thus in the year 1265 the countess of Leicester, sister of Henry the Third, was guided on her road from Odiham castle to Porchester by " Dobbe " the shepherd. It must be borne in mind also that in the absence of bridges it was necessary to have persons well acquainted with the fording places of rivers or streams. A good illustration of the difliculty and insecurity of travelling at the close of this century, is afforded by an account of the cost of transmitting a sum of money to Prince Edward, son of Edward the First, in 1301. In that year a portion of the revenue accruing from his appanage of Chester was sent to London, to replenish his generally exhausted exchequer. " The facts stated above are recited in The preamble states that the charges and the patent granted to the "men called privileges of the association had existed hakney-men" in the 19th Ric. II. (1896.) in the times of the king's progenitors. The treasure, one thousand pounds, was brought to London by two knights on horseback, William de la Mare (Delamere) and Gilbert de Wyleye, who were attended by sixteen armed valets, on foot. It was not sufficient, however, that the money should be protected by men at arms; in the absence of hostels, excepting in towns, it was necessary to secure the guards from hunger. Therefore they were accompanied by two cooks, who provided "a safe lodging" daily for the money, and, as a matter of course, provided for the culinary necessities of its conductors. These cooks were...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 102 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 195g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236934075
  • 9781236934079