Soldiers True; The Story of the One Hundred and Eleventh Regiment Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers and of Its Campaigns in the War for the Union, 1861-1865

Soldiers True; The Story of the One Hundred and Eleventh Regiment Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers and of Its Campaigns in the War for the Union, 1861-1865

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 edition. Excerpt: ...report showed sixty-three thousand eight hundred and eighty-nine officers and men and two hundred and seventy-five guns present. The Union commander lost no time in addressing himself to his task. He made a personal inspection of his lines, and carefully noted those of the enemy. The pickets of the center of both armies were separated only by Chattanooga Creek, and Grant visited his outposts accompanied by one bugler. The command to "turn out the guard for the commanding general" was heard and repeated by the Confederate pickets, who actually lined up and saluted him from their station, and the same day he conversed with one of Longstreet's men who sat on a log that had fallen across the stream. On the right our own pickets and those of the enemy familiarly chaffed each other across the deep but narrow Lookout Creek. The flag which the One Hundred and Eleventh Regiment had captured at Chancellorsville from the Fifth Alabama was often satirically mentioned, and its former possessors were frequently invited to come over and get it. By October 18 Grant's plans were complete. He proposed a direct assault all along Bragg's front, and only awaited Sherman's arrival. Howard's Eleventh Corps was taken from the right and posted across the river and behind the hills in rear of the town. Thomas was ordered to be ready to storm Missionary Ridge in the center. Sherman, on his appearance, was to attack the enemy's extreme right, at the eastern extremity of the ridge, turn it, seize his depot of supplies at Chickamauga Station, and thus threaten the railroad in his rear. Hooker was to charge Lookout Mountain and fight his way from Lookout to Chattanooga valley, on the right of Grant's line. This program meant business for all concerned. The ground...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 104 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 200g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236610881
  • 9781236610881