Soils, Formation, Physical and Chemical Characteristics and Methods of Improvement, Including Tillage, Drainage & Irrigation Volume 1

Soils, Formation, Physical and Chemical Characteristics and Methods of Improvement, Including Tillage, Drainage & Irrigation Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...(in one sense the seed) from which they come are distributed in countless ways. They are wafted through the air by the lightest breeze, they are likely to be present in the dust adhering to the seed of the legume upon which a given bacterium has grown; they remain in the soil from year to year. When we first begin to cultivate a legume in a given locality, let us suppose it is a new crop like the cow pea or the soy bean, we may find but few of the nodules upon the roots because the right kind of bacterium is not abundant; but this bacterium multiplies rapidly and after a few years is likely to become so abundant that the new crop will thrive much better than at first. In some cases, however, it may become necessary to obtain some of the right sort of bacteria for a new crop, by securing soil from the field where the crop has long been cultivated, or the seed may be obtained in the form of a special preparation or culture. Two quite distinct kinds of cultures have been introduced, viz.: nitragin, which is a jelly-like substance produced in European laboratories, and nitroculture, first developed in the United States Department of Agriculture, but now offered also by private, companies. Nitroculture is sent out in packages on prepared cotton, accompanied with packages of chemical nutrients to be employed in preparing for use. Full directions accompany every package either of nitragin or nitroculture. In ordering, the crop for which desired and the area must be specified. Trials of both nitragin and nitroculture have often resulted in failures, and it is apparent that further improvements are necessary. In cases where inoculation appears desirable, it will at present be found best to depend upon soil from a field where the crop has been successfully...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 82 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 163g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236551486
  • 9781236551481