Social England; A Record of the Progress of the People in Religion, Laws, Learning, Arts, Industry, Commerce, Science, Literature and Manners, from the Earliest Times to the Present Day Volume 5

Social England; A Record of the Progress of the People in Religion, Laws, Learning, Arts, Industry, Commerce, Science, Literature and Manners, from the Earliest Times to the Present Day Volume 5

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1899 edition. Excerpt: ...Another important new process was that of casting steel, first discovered by Benjamin Huntsman, of Sheffield. It was believed that the process was complicated, and Huntsman kept his secret for some little time, while imitators tried their best to find it out. The secret was discovered by Walker, of Greenside, a rival founder, who, as the story goes, disguised himself as a tramp and begged to be allowed to sit near the furnace one bitter night for the sake of the warmth. In Huntsman's process the blister steel was broken up and melted in crucibles with lids, the heat being kept on till the steel seemed to boil, and after three hours it could be poured off into moulds in the usual way. A layer of glass was generally put on top of the steel, but this does not seem to have served for anything but to mislead imitators. Huntsman used excellent materials, and his steel was of first-rate quality; although it was not at first popular in Sheffield, it was much used in France, and was found to be so good that Sheffield had to take it up in self-defence. The Carron v.orks gave the name to the carron-ades, "a piece of carriage ordnance cast for the first time in 1779, at the iron works of the Carron Company. Although shorter than the navy 4-pounder and lighter by a trifle than the navy 12-pounder, this gun etpualled in its cylinder the 8-inch howitzer." The boring of these cannon was not very exact, for when cylinders for Watt's engines were bored at Carron by the same machinery, Watt congratulated himself if they were not more than three-eighths of an inch out. John Wilkinson, of Bersham, invented an improved machine.., l., John Wilkinson, lor bormg cylmders true, and executed many orders from Boulton and Watt. Wilkinson is an interesting figure in the iron...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 240 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 435g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236661842
  • 9781236661845