Social Change in Contemporary Britain

Social Change in Contemporary Britain

Edited by  , Edited by 

List price: US$30.95

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This book is a lively and up-to-date account of the major developments in British society over the last 25 years. It is an excellent teaching text and an ideal companion volume to the highly successful textbook Contemporary British Society. Consisting of nine essays by leading sociologists, Social Change in Contemporary Britain examines some of the most important changes which have occurred during the lifetime of most students today. Areas which are discussed include: the decline of manufacturing industry; changes in higher education and the effects these have had on womens' employment opportunities; the development of pop music over the past 25 years. The volume also includes chapters on the changing sexual division of labour; Thatcherism and post-Fordism; changes in household structure and dynamics; new religious movements, and crime and policing from the 1960s to the 1980s.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 200 pages
  • 152 x 229 x 25.4mm | 324g
  • Polity Press
  • Oxford, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 1fig.11tabs.
  • 0745607837
  • 9780745607832

Table of contents

Introduction, Nicholas Abercrombie and Alan Warde; from social democracy to Thatcherism - 25 years of British politics, Bob Jessop; from Beatles to Bros - 25 years of British pop, Simon Frith; where did all the bright girls go? women's higher education and employment since 1964; change in the domestic division of labour in the UK 1975-1987 - dependent labour versus adaptive partnership, Johnathan Gershuny; the rising demand for law and order and our Maginot lines of defence against crime, Jock Young; changing households? changing work?, Liz Stanley; the sacralization of the self and the New Age capitalism, Paul Heelas; the end of the industrial worker?, Huw Benyon.show more

About Nicholas Abercrombie

Andrew Warde is Professor of Sociology at the University of Lancaster.show more