Slang; A Dictionary of the Turf, the Ring, the Chase, the Pit, or Bon-Ton, and the Varieties of Life, Forming the Completest and Most Authentic Lexicon Balatronicum Hitherto Offered to the Notice of the Sporting World

Slang; A Dictionary of the Turf, the Ring, the Chase, the Pit, or Bon-Ton, and the Varieties of Life, Forming the Completest and Most Authentic Lexicon Balatronicum Hitherto Offered to the Notice of the Sporting World

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1823 edition. Excerpt: ..."Fierce from his lair, springs forth the speckled pard, Thirsting for blood, and eager to destroy. Unharboured now the royal stag forsakes His wonted lair; he shakes his dappled sides, And tosses high his beamy head.. JLead Towels--pistols: nearly gone out of use, along with the practice of highway-robbery, except in the song of George Barnwell; where it says, Make Nunky surrender bis dibs, Rub his pate with a pair of lead towel, Or stick a knife into his ribs, I'll warrant he'll then show some bowefe. Rum-ti-iddityrti. iLeary--ffy, or up to a thing or manoeuvre. egs--i. e; blacklegs. The monosyllable is, however, most elegant, as it leaves something to be guessed at. They are well dressed, sometimes well educated, sharpers at gambling-houses or race-courses, &c.; but legs appear in private parties frequently, assuming much the surface of gentility.-Animal courage they possets, nine pair having fought duels in the year 1822, and they possess skill tod, every qne having missed manslaughter. "Oh, my; leg!' is a hint to a discharged convict; and gave name proba.bly to the legs.., ', -, ..'; ., . Leger (St.) Stakes--are a payment of 25 guineas each, by the owners of 3-year olds, (horses and mares) to be run for over a course of about 2 miles, more or less; the winner takes or sweeps off all--whence 'sweepstakes.' Colts carry 8st. 21bs; fillies 8st. They were begun at Doncaster in 1776, before which time, the fashion of running 3 yr-olds was limited; the application of names to the several stakes, as Derby, Craven, and St. Leger, began soon after then--Legere is French for light weights. In 1822, 73 horses were named, and 23 started. Let loose--that part of the ring at a bull-bait, where the dogs are slipped, or let loose. 'The...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 78 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123658905X
  • 9781236589057