Sketches of the War Between the United States and the British Isles; Intended as a Faithful History of All the Material Events from the Time of the Declaration in 1812 to ... the Treaty of Peace in 1815; Interspersed with Geographical [!]

Sketches of the War Between the United States and the British Isles; Intended as a Faithful History of All the Material Events from the Time of the Declaration in 1812 to ... the Treaty of Peace in 1815; Interspersed with Geographical [!]

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1815 edition. Excerpt: ...to cross the river at all points of the bend was made by the enemy, but not one ever escaped, every few ever reached the bankKand that few was killed the la2 stant they landed. From the report of my officers as well as from my own observation, I feel warranted in saying that from two hundred and fifty to three hundred of the enemy was buried under water and was not numbered with the dead that were found. The followingletter from Colonel Morgan to Governor Blount, dated at Fort Williams, contains many incidents of an interesting nature, in addition to the foregoing: ' You have been informed of our departure' from fort Strother, and arrival at this place on the 21st March. On the 24th General Jackson took up his line of march for Tohopiska, or fortified town on the Tallapoosa, commonly called the Horse Shoe. On the evening of the 28th, he encamped about six miles northwest of it....the army next morning was divided into two divisions. The horse and Indians commanded by General Coffee, crossed the river two miles below the tovn, with directions to line the bank in the whole extent of the bend, by the Cherokees and friendly Creeks, while the horse acted as a guard upon the high ground, to defend our rear from an attack from the Oakfuskee lndians, who were expected from below. This precaution was, however, unnecessary, as their whole force had been concentrated the day before. General Colfee had arrived on the opposite shore, about half a mile below the town, when General Jackson's approach before the fortification was announced by the discharge of artillery, and in quick succession that of a brigade of infantry. The Cherokees immediately rushed to the point assigned them, which they did in regular order, and. in a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 234 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 426g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236866517
  • 9781236866516