Sketch of the New Anatomy and Physiology of the Brain and Nervous System of Drs. Gall and Spurzheim, Considered as Comprehending a Complete System of Zoonomy. with Observations on Its Tendency to the Improvement of Education

Sketch of the New Anatomy and Physiology of the Brain and Nervous System of Drs. Gall and Spurzheim, Considered as Comprehending a Complete System of Zoonomy. with Observations on Its Tendency to the Improvement of Education

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1816 edition. Excerpt: ...or the look of Hope, emphatically painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds? The Intellectual faculties have also a peculiar expression. Do we not shut and press the eyes-to remember names?--Does not an arithmetician move his eyes outward, and his. head, backward and forward in calcuCran. F lation?--Does not poetical fancy throtf the eyes outward and upward? People wag the head backwards and forwards in a peculiar manner, in hearing musical tones and merry tunes. Observe a remarkable example in the Pandeans at Vauxhall. Does not Sterne put his finger on the organ of wit?--In short there is an expression corresponding to the activity of every organ, to which the eyes are often turned when it is in action, and which we frequently stimulate into action, by the external application of the fingers, and whose activity we denote by the manner of holding the head. Vain would be the attempt to describe on paper this accurate natural language. The curious inquirer must attend to Nature for himself; but Dr. Spurzheiin's Lectures, where he speaks of Expression, must be a fund of entertainment to those who are fond of physiognomy. Thus has been determined in some measure by the physiologist of the brain, the relation between physiognomy or the ex ternal expression of the muscles, and the place and physiology of the organs. Thus therefore, has been reduced to definitive principles, founded on physiological and anatomical investigation, what Lavater was incapable of determining from observation on manners alone; but of which he had a sufficient glimpse to form for himself, in many cases, a tolerably just notion of persons. It must be remembered, that, excepting idiots, all the organs are in some degree possessed by all persons. They are useful, and constitute the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 24 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 64g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236904885
  • 9781236904881