Sievers' Law and the History of Semivowel Syllabicity in Indo-European and Ancient Greek

Sievers' Law and the History of Semivowel Syllabicity in Indo-European and Ancient Greek

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Description

This book investigates how semivowels were realized in Indo-European and in early Greek. More specifically, it examines the extent to which Indo-European *i and *y were independent phonemes, in what respects their alternation was predictable, and how this situation changed as Indo-European developed into Greek.
The comprehensive and chronologically sensitive nature of this study, together with its careful assessment of what is inherited and what is innovative, enables substantive conclusions to be drawn regarding the behaviour of semivowels at various stages in the history of Greek and in Indo-European itself.
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Product details

  • Hardback | 454 pages
  • 162 x 236 x 35mm | 844g
  • Oxford, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 0199680507
  • 9780199680504
  • 1,408,736

Table of contents

PREFACE; PART 1: EVIDENCE FOR SIEVERS' LAW AND THE POSSIBILITY OH INHERITANCE; PART II: GREEK NOMINAL CATEGORIES; PART III: VERBAL CATEGORIES; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX
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Review quote

Barbers book is a valuable contribution to the field, and will be a standard work on the shelves of those interested in Greek historical phonology. * O. B. Simkin, Gnomom * The book is bound to become an important reference work for scholars working on Indo-European syllabification or on Greek historical grammar. * Lucien van Beek, Mnemosyne * We are fortunate to have Barber's fine-grained study of the Greek data to further pursue such questions. * D.M. Goldstein, The Classical Journal Online *
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About Peter Barber

P. J. Barber is a Departmental Lecturer in Comparative Philology at the University of Oxford. His interests include Indo-European, Greek, and Indo-Iranian phonology, Greek verbal semantics, and contemporary syntactic theory.
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