Sidereal Chromatics; Being a Re-Print, with Additions from the "Bedford Cycle of Celestial Objects," and Its "Hartwell Continuation," on the Colours of Multiple Stars

Sidereal Chromatics; Being a Re-Print, with Additions from the "Bedford Cycle of Celestial Objects," and Its "Hartwell Continuation," on the Colours of Multiple Stars

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1864 edition. Excerpt: ...power, whether exerted in a passion for stars, flowers, and mundane finery--or in contributing to render the painter's art impressive to the imagination, and delightful to the eye. While therefore a spectator is able to enjoy the sensitive perception of the varied gradations of hues and tints, he need not involve himself in the vexata questio as to colours being material or not--whether entities or individualities. That they are not yet really reducible to a single principle, is no reason why they should not be used most comprehensively, and every advance must be duly encouraged for the results that may ensue. We tried an experiment on chromatic personal equation, The Hartwell in its simplest form, at Hartwell, on a fine evening, theexpenmentsecond of July, 1829. Having prepared a stone pedestal in front of the south portico of the house, on which was placed a Gregorian telescope of 5 inches aperture, a party of visitors, consisting of six ladies and five gentlemen, were invited to gaze upon the double-star Cor Caroli; and they Chromatography is not so near perfection as the power of the eye and state of art would lead us to suppose it to be; but it is hoped that Mr. Chevreul's beautiful work on Colours, which has appeared since the above was printed, will yield a useful standard of tints for astrometry, as well as for manufactures, so as to afford an easy and ready reference. D were each to tell me--sotto voce to prevent bias--what they deemed the respective colours of the components to be. The first who stepped out by request, was my good friend the late Rev. Mr. Pawsey--more addicted to heraldry than to astronomy--who, after a very momentary snatch, flatly declared that he "could make out nothing particular: " but the other spectators...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236558650
  • 9781236558657