A Short Comparative Grammar of English and German; As Traced Back to Their Common Origin and Contrasted with the Classical Languages

A Short Comparative Grammar of English and German; As Traced Back to Their Common Origin and Contrasted with the Classical Languages

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1894 edition. Excerpt: ...and G. lauter (purely, merely),1 etc. To the M.H.G. adjectives fro-lich (gay), groj-lich (great), etc., naturally corresponded the adverbs fru-Uch-e (gaily), gruj-lich-e (greatly), etc. Now, these forms, if directly opposed to the simple adjectives froh, grosz, etc., contained an ending-llche-lich, which was mistaken for the characteristic of the adverbial function and transferred elsewhere with this value by an obvious analogy. This process was carried on with great energy in M.H.G., and, though now extinct, has left some traces in the contemporary speech, several formations with suffix-lich being even now exclusively used with an adverbial meaning: frei-lich (to be sure), kilrz-lich (in short), schwer-lich, hoffent-lich. 1 Final-e kept in G. lang-e (a long time), contrasted with the adjective lung. 5. English has gone the same way, but farther, and quite consistently: E.-ly is no longer an adjectival suffix, except when added to a noun; if added to an adjective, it forms an adverb. Thus, the type reich-lich is essentially an adjective in G., while its E. representative rich-ly can be nothing but an adverb. This transformation gave English a specific adverbial exponent, whereas German usually employs as such the old instrumental case, now represented by the nndeclined adjective, as final-e has dropped long ago. The E. suff.-ly modifies indifferently any adjective, whether primitive or derivative (wise-ly, idly = id-le-ly = G. eit-el-lich, form-er-ly, sorrow-ful-ly), native or borrowed (yeri-ly,1 vacant-ly, glorious-ly), and even some nouns (night-ly, name-ly, purpose-ly).2 II. E.-som-some = O.E.-sum, the unaccented form of E. same; G.-som: adjectives denoting qualification or aptitude.--The word is lost in German, but may be found in O.N. scem-r...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 140 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 263g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236529936
  • 9781236529930