A Short Account of the Kachcha Naga (Empeo) Tribe in the North Cachar Hills; With an Outline Grammar, Vocabulary, and Illustrative Sentences

A Short Account of the Kachcha Naga (Empeo) Tribe in the North Cachar Hills; With an Outline Grammar, Vocabulary, and Illustrative Sentences

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1885 edition. Excerpt: ...gftbak, pig; the term kdt (one) being often used to make the sense more complete. 2. The plural is formed in four distinct and welldefined ways. In this respect the language differs greatly from both hill and plains Kachari, in both of which there is merely one plural termination for objects animate and inanimate. The following are the four forms of plural: --First (a) In nouns referring to human beings only, the plural is formed by the addition of mi to the singular, e.g., --. (1) Mi'na, man; mina-mi, men. (2) Buna, child; bamimi, children. (3) Embo, Naga; emb6mi, Nagas. Second (6) In reference to animals, birds, insects, &c, by adding ddng to the singular, e.g., --Singular. Plural. Godom, a cow godom dung, cows. Gabftk, pig gabak dung, pigs. Enrui, fowl enrui dung, fowls. Gili&, bee gilia dung, bees. Third (c) In the case of plants, trees, &c, by the addition oijed to the singular, e.g., --Singular. Plural Ham&na, pumpkin hamana j66, pumpkins. Jing-bang, tree jing-bang-je6, trees. 83 (1) (2) Fourth (ff) In reference to things without life, by the addition kSdd to the singular, e.g., --Singular. Plural: (1) Harei, Avar harei k&dk, wars. (2) KflM, bridge kahS, keda, bridges. (3) Mi, fire mi keda, fires. 3. In compounds the last words take the plural termination, e.g., b&nft-pdo, lit., child-owner; plural ban&--p6o-mi, and not Mnami-peo. 4. A plural form in nung is used in the same way as the Hindustani to/lie; thus, gadaba-nung, otlier ones dusre-wdle); rame-nung, the villagers (gaon-wale). N.B.--In conversing, the plural forms of nouns are nearly always suppressed, the singular form alone being made use of with a plural significance. 5. For the purpose of conveying greater emphasis, the substantive in N&ga is oftshow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236644409
  • 9781236644404