Shilling Annotated Plays of Shakspeare for Students; Each Play with Explanatory and Illustrative Notes Critical Remarks and Other AIDS to a Thorough Understanding of the Drama. Edited for the Use of Schools and Students Preparing Volume 6

Shilling Annotated Plays of Shakspeare for Students; Each Play with Explanatory and Illustrative Notes Critical Remarks and Other AIDS to a Thorough Understanding of the Drama. Edited for the Use of Schools and Students Preparing Volume 6

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1869 edition. Excerpt: ...and food. Reg. Good sir, no more; these are unsightly tricks: Return you to my sister. Lear. Rising Never, Regan! She hath abated me of half my train; Looked black upon me; struck me with her tongue, Most serpent like, upon the very heart: --All the stored vengeances of heaven fall On her ingrateful top! Strike her young bones, You taking2 airs, with lameness! Corn. Fie, sir, fie! Lear. You nimble lightnings, dart your blinding flames Into her soornful eyes! 'Infect her beauty, You fen-sucked fogs, drawn by the powerful sun To fall and blast her pride! Reg. O the blest gods! so will you wish on me, When the rash mood is on. Lear. No, Regan, thou shalt never have my curse; Thy tender-hefted nature shall not give 1 How this becomes the house. The pI'0l101111 this refers to the form of supplication Lear is about to utter: he ironically bids his daughter mark how consistent such language is with that order of nature which should regulate a, household. 2 T aking. To take signified to smite with infection or infirmity. So in Act iii. sc. 4, 'Bless thee from whirlwinds, star-blasting and taking.' And in Hamlet, i. 1, ' Then no planets strike, no fairy takes.' Thee o'er to harshness: 1 her eyes are fierce, but thine Do comfort, and not burn. 'Tis not in thee To grudge my pleasures, to out off my train, To bandy hasty words, to scant my sizes,2 And, in conclusion, to oppose the bolt. Against my coming in: thou better know'st The oflices of nature, bond of childhood, Effects of courtesy, dues of gratitude; Thy half o' the kingdom hast thou not forgot, Wherein I thee endowed. Reg. Good sir, to the purpose. Lear. Who put my manwi' the stocks? Trumpet without. Corn. What trumpet's...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236744845
  • 9781236744845