Shilling Annotated Plays of Shakspeare for Students; Each Play with Explanatory and Illustrative Notes Critical Remarks and Other AIDS to a Thorough Understanding of the Drama. Edited for the Use of Schools and Students Volume 16

Shilling Annotated Plays of Shakspeare for Students; Each Play with Explanatory and Illustrative Notes Critical Remarks and Other AIDS to a Thorough Understanding of the Drama. Edited for the Use of Schools and Students Volume 16

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1869 edition. Excerpt: ...ingenious pictorial artifices are often referred to by the old writers. They were of various kinds. Shakspeare seems here to refer to apainting which, when viewed directly, presented to the eye a confused group of irregular spots and lines, but which were so arranged according to the rules of giersyaeclive, that, when the painting was viewed obliquely, the spots, lines, and blank spaces became so contracted as to form a proper picture. Queen. 'Tis nothing less: ' conceit is still derived From some forefather grief; 2 mine is not so; For nothing had begot my something grief, Or something hath the nothing 3 that I grieve; 'Tis in reversion that I do possess; But what it is, that is not yet known; what, I cannot name; 'tis nameless woe, I wot. Enter GREEN. Green. Heaven save your majesty!--and well met, gentlemen: --I hope the king is not yet shipped for Ireland. Queen. Why hop'st thou so? 'tis better hope he is; For his designs crave haste, his haste good hope; Then wherefore dost thou hope he is not shipped? Green. That he, our hope, might have retired his power, ' And driven into despair an enemy's hope, Who strongly hath set footing in this land: The banished Bolingbroke repeals himself, And with uplifted arms is safe arrived At Ravenspurg. Queen. Now God in heaven forbid! Green. O, madam, 'tis too true; and, that 5 is worse, ' 'Tis nothing less Nothing can be less so; it is any thing but conceit. In this sense the words were anciently quite familiar. Thus in Latimer's Sermons, ' Many things were taken for prayer when they were nothing less.' ' Such outward acts seem to be done with a good heart, when it is nothing less.' See the Editor's.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236751000
  • 9781236751003