Shelford's Law of Railways; Containing the Whole of the Statute Law for the Regulation of Railways in England, Scotland and Ireland with Copious Notes of Decided Cases Upon the Statutes, Introduction to the Law of Railways, and Volume 2

Shelford's Law of Railways; Containing the Whole of the Statute Law for the Regulation of Railways in England, Scotland and Ireland with Copious Notes of Decided Cases Upon the Statutes, Introduction to the Law of Railways, and Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1869 edition. Excerpt: ...or context to require that they should be construed as compulsory, and that the case was not affected by the fact that the company had completed a part of the line. York and North Midland Sail. Co. v. Reg., 1 E. & B. 858. A company were authorized by statute in 1846 to make a railway, with compulsory powers for taking lands. By an act passed in 1849, the time before limited for completing the railway, and for using the compulsory powers, were extended; the work was to be completed in 1853, and the compulsory powers to expire in July, 1851. The company were empowered to create shares and to raise money by calls to a certain amount and otherwise. The act of 1849 expressly authorized them to abandon a certain part of the line first proposed. A rule nisi was obtained in Easter term, 1851, for a mandamus to complete the railway, and cause was shown on July 20, 1851. It appeared that the company had staked out part of the line of railway, and made some excavations to ascertain the nature of the soil, but had taken no other step towards executing the work, or to acquire lands for the purpose. They had raised money, and had made calls on the shares to the extent of four-fifths. In 1850, the company, having many works on their hands, and being in difficulties, resolved at a halfyearly meeting, that no new works chargeable on capital should be undertaken without the consent of a meeting of the shareholders; and this resolution was made public. In January, 1851, the company were applied to by a deputation from the landowners (some of whom were applicants for the mandamus), on the subject of completing the railway; and they declined doing so. There were conflicting statements as to the probability of benefit to the landowners or the public from the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 548 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 28mm | 966g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236542533
  • 9781236542533