A Shakespearian Grammar; An Attempt to Illustrate Some of the Differences Between Elizabethan and Modern English; For the Use of Schools

A Shakespearian Grammar; An Attempt to Illustrate Some of the Differences Between Elizabethan and Modern English; For the Use of Schools

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1874 edition. Excerpt: ...shall seem probable) every one of these accidents." " My honour's at the stake, which (danger) to defeat I must produce my power."--A. I/V. ii. 3. 156. 272. Which for " as to which." Hence which and "the which" are loosely used adverbially for "as to which." So in Latin, " quod" in " quod si." " Showers of blood, The which how far off from the mind of Bolingbroke lt is such crimson tempest should bedew," &c. Rich. 11. iii. 3. 45. " With unrestrained loose compani0ns----Even such, they say, as stand in narrow lanes, And beat our watch, and rob our passengers; Which he, young, wanton, and effeminate boy, Takes on the point of honour, to support So dissolute a crew."--Rich. 11. v. 3. 10. " But God be thanked for prevention: I/Vhich I in sutferance heartily will rejoice." Hm. V. 2. 159 273, Which. It is hard to explain the following: unless Which is used for the kindred " whether." In " My virtue or my plague, be it either which," Hamlet, iv. 7. 13. there is perhaps a. confusion between "be it either" and "be it whichever of the two. " Perhaps, however, " either" may be taken in its original sense of "one of the two," so that "either whic " is "which-one-so-ever of the two." " Who does the wolf love? The lamb. "--Coriol. ii. I. 8. Compare VV. 7: iv. 4.. 66, v. I. 109. Apparently it is not so common to omit the m when the whom is governed by a. preposition whose contiguity demands the inflection: " There is a mystery with whom relation Durst never meddle/'--Tr. and Cr. iii. 3. 201. Compare especially, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 188.98 x 246.13 x 4.83mm | 185.97g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236905377
  • 9781236905376
  • 1,833,159