Shakespeare's Centurie of Prayse; Being Materials for a History of Opinion on Shakespeare and His Works, Culled from Writers of the First Century After His Rise

Shakespeare's Centurie of Prayse; Being Materials for a History of Opinion on Shakespeare and His Works, Culled from Writers of the First Century After His Rise

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1874 edition. Excerpt: ...Merrit Beggars 1653, in a passage quoted in the Third Period) here resers to the speech of Falstaflf, which concludes the first scene of 2 Henry IV, act v. Page Hi. By the use of the expression "idle pamphlets" Brother Robinson did not necessarily intend (as Mr. Collier supposes, Bibliog. and Crit. Account, ii, 274) to depreciate Shakespeare's poem. An "idle pamphlet," at that time of day, meant one which asforded diversion rather than edification. Surely "scurrilous booke" (to which Mr. Collier takes no exception) implies a much graver charge; and Sir Aston Cokaine imputes the same evil quality to Shakespeare's writings. Page 112. By an oversight the editor gave this passage from the folio 1630 instead of from the quarto 1620. It should properly have preceded the extract on p. 89. Farmer says it is "impossible to give the original dates" of John Taylor's pieces. "He may be traced as an author for more than half a century." (BoswelPs Malone, 1821, vol. i, p. 367.) Page 114. We have the choice of three early printed versions of Milton's lines: I. The commendatory verses prefixed to the Folio Edition of Shakespeare, 1632. 2. Those appended to the unauthorised edition of Shakespeare's Foems, published in 1640. 3. The edition of Milton's poems published in 1645. We have preserred the first and least pleasing of the three, as being, unquestionably, Milton's first draft of the line: allowing, of course, that part is a press-error for "hart" (i.e., heart). The other versions correct that error, and also have "weake" for dull, and "livelong" for lasting. The second, by a press-error, reads "our seife" instead of her seise. The third has "it seife." In the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 58 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236586352
  • 9781236586353