Shakespeareana Genealogica; Part I. Identification of the Dramatis Personae in Shakespeare's Historical Plays from K. John to K. Henry VIII. Notes on

Shakespeareana Genealogica; Part I. Identification of the Dramatis Personae in Shakespeare's Historical Plays from K. John to K. Henry VIII. Notes on

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1869 edition. Excerpt: ...And in the next line the "Scotch Doctor" says, aside, --"Were 1 from Dunsinane away and clear." In Scene 4 Siward says that the confident tyrant--"Keeps still in Dunsinane, and will endure." In Scene 5 Macbeth again quotes the memorable prophecy "that lies like truth,"--"Fear not, till Birnam wood Do come to Dunsinane; and now a wood Comes toward Dunsinane." 1 Dunsinnan House was built in the of Session, took the territorial title of last century by a Scotch advocate, who Lord Dunsinnan. on being raised to the bench, as a lord And in the last scene (7) once more he refers, in the desperation of valour, to its fulfilment;--"Though Birnam wood be come to Dunsinane." All these instances will require the last syllable to be accented long; which, however, is not the manner in which a Scot would pronounce the word. Macbeth has been ably vindicated from the double charge of ingratitude and treason by Mr Chalmers, who considers that as the son of Doada, daughter of Malcolm II., Macbeth "might well enter into competition with Duncan for the crown." The same excellent authority says, " Macbeth united in himself all the power which was possessed by the partizans of Kenneth IV.; all the influence of the Lady Gruoch, and of her son Lulach, together with the authority of Maormor of Ross." He also observes, " Macbeth had to avenge the wrongs of his wife, and to resent for himself the death of his father," who, as the same writer states, "fell a sacrifice to the demon of enmity in 1020." According to tradition a son of Macbeth was slain with him, in his last encounter with Malcolm. At a place called Tough, a few miles north of L-umphannan, a large standing stone, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 194 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 354g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236622863
  • 9781236622860