The Seven Great Monarchies of the Eastern World; Or the History, Geography and Antiquities of Chaldaea, Assyria, Babylon, Media, Persia, Parthia, and Sassanian or New Persian Empire Volume 2

The Seven Great Monarchies of the Eastern World; Or the History, Geography and Antiquities of Chaldaea, Assyria, Babylon, Media, Persia, Parthia, and Sassanian or New Persian Empire Volume 2

By (author) 

List price: US$38.14

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1885 edition. Excerpt: ...of the Persian dominion in every province that had been conquered. According to Herodotus, the single country of Egypt contained, in his day. a standing army of 120,000 Persians;"0 and. although this was no doubt an exceptional case, Egypt being more prone to revolt than any other satrapy, '41 yet there is abundant evidence that elsewhere, in almost every part of the Empire, large bodies of troops were regularly maintained; troops which are always characterized as "Persians." 5" We may suspect that under the name were included the kindred nation of the Modes, and perhaps some other Arian races, as the Hyrcanians, and the Bactrians, for it is difficult to conceive that such a country as Persia Proper could alone have kept up the military force which the Empire required for its preservation; but to whatever extent the standing army was supplemented from these sources, Persia must still have furnished the bulk of it; and the demands of this service must have absorbed, at the very least, one third if not one half of the adult male population. For trade and commerce the Persians were wont to express extreme contempt.144 The richer classes made it their boast that they neither bought nor sold, " being supplied (we must suppose) from their estates, and by their slaves and dependents, with all that they needed for the common purposes of life. Persians of the middle rank would condescend to buy, but considered it beneath them to sell; while only the very lowest and poorest were actual artisans and traders. Shops were banished from the more public parts of the towns;M" and thus such commercial transactions as took place were veiled in what was regarded as a decent obscurity. The reason assigned for this low estimation of trade...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 304 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 16mm | 544g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123660847X
  • 9781236608475