The Seven Deadly Sins of London, Drawn in Seven Several Coaches, Through the Seven Several Gates of the City; Bringing the Plague with Them, October 1606

The Seven Deadly Sins of London, Drawn in Seven Several Coaches, Through the Seven Several Gates of the City; Bringing the Plague with Them, October 1606

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ... that sayes he has been a Soldier on the other side. His attendants are Sicknes, Want, Ignorance, Infamy, Bondage, Palenes, Blockishnes, and Carelesnes. The Retayners that wear his cloth are Anglers, Dumb Ministers, Players, Exchange-Wenches, Gamsters, Pandars, Whores and F idlers. _ ILoth was not so slow in his march, when hee entred the Citie, but Apishnesse (that was to take his turne next) was as quick. Do you not know him? It cannot be read in any Chronicle, that he was euer with H enrie the eight at Bulloigne or at ye winning of Turze-in and Turnay: for (not _... " to belie the sweete Gentleman, ) he was neither in the shell then, no nor then when Paules-steeple and the Weathercocke were on fire; by which markes (without looking in his mouth) you may safely sweare, that hees but yong, for hees a feirse, dapper fellow, more light headed then a Musitian: as phantastically attyred as a Court Ieaster: wanton in discourse: lasciuious in behauiour; iocond in good companie: nice in his trencher, and yet he feedes verie hungerly on scraps of songs: he drinkes in a Glasse well, but vilely in a deepe Frenchbowle: yet much about the yeare when Monsieur came in, was hee begotten, betweene a French Tayler, and an English Court-Seamster. This Signior Ioculento (as the diuell would haue it) comes prawncing in at Cripplegate, and he may well doe it, for indeede all the parts hee playes are but con'd speeches stolne from others, whose voices and actions he counterfeites: but so lamely, that all the Cripples in tenne Spittle-houses, shewe not more halting. The Grauer Browes were bent against him, and by the awfull Charms of Reuerend Authoritie, would haue sent him ENG. SCH. L15. N o '7. 4 downe frome whence he came, for they knew howe smooth...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236882148
  • 9781236882141