A Sermon Delivered in the Meeting House of the First Baptist Church in the City of New York, August 20th, 1812; Being a Day Recommended by the Constituted Authorities of the Nation as a Day of Special Humiliation and Prayer on Account of

A Sermon Delivered in the Meeting House of the First Baptist Church in the City of New York, August 20th, 1812; Being a Day Recommended by the Constituted Authorities of the Nation as a Day of Special Humiliation and Prayer on Account of

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1812 edition. Excerpt: ...a trap, baited with specious pretensions of an expedient for reconciliation: under these impressions, he refused to go. VVhether his refusal to meet a committee of that description, was shrinking from investigation, and so evidence of guilt, . the public are left to judge. 2-fif a similar nature, though on a more extensive scale and with a greater show of plausibility, was the proposal of having the matter, decided by a committee to be appointed of accommodation, but such as are scriptural, and therefore, (among christians, ) honourable, will be acceded to by him.. by the Association. This committee was to consist, chiefly, of brethren from a distance, that so it might have the appearance and receive the character of an impartial court. But who were these brethren from a.--distance to be? They were to be men whom the opposing party in the Association, and others in the city, had previously filled with prejudice against the man who was to be tried, and who were already known to be of that description; 'particularly'D'avid lrish was to be one, though the common associate of the excommunicated Mclntosh and Bleecker, and who, wherever he went, was endeavouring to make the impression, that the accused was guilty of the crimes alleged against him, and that the church, if they retained him, must inevitably come to rdin. The accused, notwithst'anding'all.these unfavourable circumstances, was willing, and, (as many of his brethren well know, ) frequently, before the Association convened, expressed a desire that a committee should be appointed and his case submitted to it; for he was assured, that, unless the members of such committee should be totally devoid of candor and reflection, on hearing the evidences, then ready to be exhibited, of theshow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 58 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236748417
  • 9781236748416