A Series of Letters to Daniel O'Connell, Containing a Review of Mr. O'Connell's Conduct During the Agitation of the Question of Catholic Emancipation

A Series of Letters to Daniel O'Connell, Containing a Review of Mr. O'Connell's Conduct During the Agitation of the Question of Catholic Emancipation

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1836 edition. Excerpt: ... other occasions) allow to speak, to second an admirable motion, but of course the world will suppose that you voted, at all events, for the admirable motion; surely Sir Robert Peel could not carry his personal resentment so far, as to quarrel with a member of Parliament for doing his duty, although he may feel annoyed at his taking a prominent part in his accusation; but, what will the world think, when informed, that you voted against the admirable motion, or did not vote at all as you were not one of those who divided for the motion; but to prove to you that I love justice, I voted against the motion, but I afterwards made one of four who voted against the motion being expunged from the order book, and I did it, because I thought it unconstitutional, and not from any feeling of either personal or public dislike to Sir Robert Peel. Now, wont you confess, that your joy would have been unbounded, if I had subjected myself to the personal animosity of Sir Robert Peel, and to the general reprobation of the remaining members? dont you think that the character for squabbling, which your kindness would have entailed upon me, would have spared you the necessity of continuing as my keejer? dragging me down, or attempting to stifle my voice; dont you think that a general buzz upon my rising would have affected your object? and, dont you well know, that it is in the power of the House to mark any member with disapprobation? Never was there a more deadly arrow aimed at any man, and, had it hit, you would have gloried over the ruin of your victim; but every man in the House knew, that, if I thought it a good motion, I should have seconded it, even at any personal risk, but inasmuch as I objected to Ireland being condemned, and coerced, for acts said...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 44 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236743520
  • 9781236743527