Series of Anatomical Plates; With References and Physiological Comments, Illustrating the Structure of the Different Parts of the Body

Series of Anatomical Plates; With References and Physiological Comments, Illustrating the Structure of the Different Parts of the Body

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 edition. Excerpt: ...long vessel, which descends in the middle line in front of the medulla spinalis, at the extremity of which it passes through the nervous filaments forming the cauda equina, and terminates at the lower part of the canal in delicate ramifications. This and the preceding branch give numerous ramusculi to the spinal cord and its nerves, and communicate with the branches which enter through the intervertebral foramina. The branches of the basilar artery are the following: Several ramuli are given to the cerebral protuberance and adjacent nerves: one also accompanies the acoustic nerve into the labyrinth of the ear. Ramus cerebelli superior (plate VII. fig. 4, f) turns backwards and outwards round the upper margin of the pons Varolii, to reach the superior surface of the cerebellum, upon which it ramifies freely. r. Posterior cerebri (plate VII. fig. 4, g) is larger than the preceding, and separated from it by the third nerve; it turns round the crus cerebri, and inclines backwards to the posterior lobe of the cerebruni, along which it distributes numerous branches, for the supply of its substance. At the point where this vessel turns backwards, it receives the communicating artery from the internal carotid, and so contributes to form the circle of Willis. The inferior Thyroid artery (plate IV. l; plate V. fig. 2, e; r. thyroideus inferior--ascendens.) The inferior thyroid artery is not unfrequently called thyroid axis, because, immediately after its origin, it divides into three branches, which diverge in difierent directions, viz., the inferior or ascending thyroid, the transversalis colli, and transversalis humeri. It springs from the upper surface of the subclavian artery at a point nearly opposite to that from which the internal mammary...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 426 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 22mm | 757g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236985079
  • 9781236985071