The Sentence in Language and Cognition

The Sentence in Language and Cognition

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Description

The Sentence in Language and Cognition is about the significant role of the sentence in linguistic cognition and in the practical domains of human existence. Dr. Tista Bagchi has written a comprehensive assessment of the structure and cognitive function of the sentence and the clause in the context of real-world discourse and activities. The notions of sentencehood and clausehood with special reference to the semantic histories of the terms sentence and clause, including their ethical, legal, and administrative uses, are assessed. This is followed by a concise historical survey of the treatment of the sentence in a few of the ancient linguistic traditions, notably the Greek, Roman(-Alexandrian), Arab, and Sanskrit scholastic traditions. A wide variety of sentence types, from a cross-section of languages spoken in Asia, Europe, and the Americas, are presented by way of factual evidence for sentences and clauses as linguistic units. Formally defined notions of the sentence and the clause as syntactic constituents in major theoretical frameworks are examined and assessed for their essential properties and points of convergence. The Sentence in Language and Cognition is an essential book for advanced students and researchers of linguistics.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 196 pages
  • 152.4 x 248.92 x 17.78mm | 505g
  • Lexington Books
  • Lanham, MD, United States
  • English
  • Reprint
  • 0739118463
  • 9780739118467

About Tista Bagchi

Tista Bagchi is professor of linguistics at the University of Delhi.show more

Review quote

This is a hugely literate work of enormous scope. Bagchi defends the integrity and centrality of the notion of a sentence against contrary influences of all sorts?-from philosophy (including philosophy of language), from psychology, from figurative speech and thought, from ?irrational? uses of language in poetry and creative writing, from the study of schizophrenia, and even from a cetain line of thinking within linguistics itself. Philosophers in particular, beware: It is impossible on purely linguistic grounds that all sentences should express propositions; there are formidable challenges to semantic compositionality; the relation between sentencehood and word-world reference is vexed; and there is an important sense in which a sentence?s predicate is its semantic core. -- William G. Lycan, University of North Carolinashow more

Table of contents

Chapter 1 Introduction Chapter 2 Facts about the Sentence and the Clause Chapter 3 The Sentence and the Clause in Syntax Chapter 4 The Semantics of Sentences and Clauses Chapter 5 The Sentence and the Clause in Context Chapter 6 The Morphology and the Phonology of the Sentence and the Clause Chapter 7 The Sentence in Computation and Cognition Chapter 8 The Sentence and Issues in Referring Chapter 9 The Sentence, Predication, and Causation Chapter 10 Creative Writing and the Sentenceshow more