The Selling of Supreme Court Nominees

The Selling of Supreme Court Nominees

3.5 (12 ratings by Goodreads)

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Description

Politics has always been at the heart of the Supreme Court selection process. According to John Anthony Maltese, the first "Borking" of a nominee came in 1795 with the defeat of John Rutledge's nomination as chief justice. What is different about today's appointment process, he argues, is not its politicization but the range of players involved and the political techniques that they use. In The Selling of Supreme Court Nominees, Maltese traces the evolution of the contentious and controversial confirmation process awaiting today's nominees to the nation's highest court. In this paperback edition, he includes a discussion of the recent nomination of Stephen Breyer, addressing various reform proposals made by critics of the current process and crediting President Clinton's protracted selection process with restoring some decorum to the proceedings.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 216 pages
  • 152 x 229 x 13mm | 295g
  • Baltimore, MD, United States
  • English
  • Reprint
  • No
  • 0801858836
  • 9780801858833

Back cover copy

In The Selling of Supreme Court Nominees, Maltese traces the evolution of the contentious and controversial confirmation process awaiting today's nominees to the nation's highest court. His story begins in the second half of the nineteenth century, when social and technological changes led to the rise of organized interest groups. Despite occasional victories, Maltese explains, structural factors limited the influence of such groups well into this century. Until 1913, senators were not popularly elected but chosen by state legislatures, undermining the potent threat of electoral retaliation that interest groups now enjoy. And until Senate rules changed in 1929, consideration of Supreme Court nominees took place in almost absolute secrecy. Floor debates and the final Senate vote usually took place in executive session. Even if interest groups could retaliate against senators, they often did not know whom to retaliate against.
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Review quote

A careful and concise history, description, and analysis of the modern Supreme Court appointment process... A model of concese and careful scholarship, and I highly recommend it. -- Michael Comiskey Journal of Politics Stands out in its scholarly thoroughness and innovative theory... one of the best books currently available for understanding the contemporary politics of Supreme Court nominations. -- John B. Gates The Law and Politics Book Review A highly informative study of presidential appointments and senatorial confirmation-or rejection-of those nominees to the Supreme Court throughout our history... This book is clearly written, fast paced, and very well documented. It is recommended to all interested to the political gateway to the federal appellate judiciary. Appellate Practice Journal and Update A model of concise and careful scholarship. Journal of Politics
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About John Anthony Maltese

John Anthony Maltese is associate professor of political science at the University of Georgia. His books include Spin Control: The White House Office of Communications and the Management of Presidential News.
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Rating details

12 ratings
3.5 out of 5 stars
5 8% (1)
4 33% (4)
3 58% (7)
2 0% (0)
1 0% (0)
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